Preface And Introduction Volumes 1-3

VOLUME 1

PREFACE
This work was originally written in another form as a Ph.D. dissertation for the School of Library Science of the University of Michigan, and it owes its existence to the members of the Doctoral Committee who originally decided to accept the topic and to the members of the Dissertation Committee: Dr. Russell Bidlack, Chairman, Drs. Kenneth Vance, John Reidy, Edmond Low and Sister Mary Claudia Carlen, all of whom were most kind in offering advice and sound criticism despite very busy schedules. Another member of the Michigan faculty whom I consulted was Dr. Raymond Kilgour who served on the Committee until his retirement in April of 1968.

Sister Mary Claudia, whose name appears frequently in this bibliography, supplied perhaps the most aid and encouragement as a result of her expertise in the field of Catholic bibliography, and much of the research was done at her library at Marygrove College, Detroit, Michigan.

Other libraries where I received welcome and aid were at the University of Michigan, the Catholic University of America, Villanova University, The University of Pennsylvania and the Library of Congress.
Mrs. Kathryn Stephanoff, Director of Libraries in Allentown, Pennsylvania, very kindly prepared the index and proofread the manuscript.

Finally, I would like to acknowledge the kindness of my confreres in the Congregation of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales who provided accommodations and encouragement during my research.
JAMES PATRICK McCABE, O.S.F.S.

INTRODUCTION
Many bibliographical studies of Catholic literature have been done in recent years, but these works have been primarily concerned with either guiding the reader to the "best books" on a particular subject or with listing all books by and/or about Catholics and Catholicism published in a given period or place. In the present work, James McCabe has compiled a much more comprehensive guide in the area of Catholic bibliography than has been attempted previously. He has provided a critical introduction to over 900 of the most important reference :books in English and foreign languages whose contents or point of view relate in some way to Catholicism.

In formulating a definition of a reference work, Brother James has gone beyond the conventional definition and, like Constance M. Winchell in her Guide to Reference Books, had included books "which, while intended primarily to be read through for either information or pleasure, are so comprehensive and accurate in their treatment and so well provided with indexes that they serve also as reference books." (8th edition, Chicago, American Library Association, 1967, p. xiv). The books listed fall into two classes: (1) those dealing with topics peculiar to the Church, such as liturgy and other theological disciplines; and (2) those dealing with the social sciences, literature, the arts, and similar subjects to which Catholics have traditionally contributed a unique perspective.

In selecting titles from this body of literature for inclusion here, Brother James introduced a number of limitations which have added to the practicality of his list. Only published works currently available to the researcher in the United Stales are included. Rare or very old books have been omitted unless they are unusually important or unique. While the main emphasis is on works in English, foreign language titles have been freely included if they are widely known, comprehensive in scope, and scholarly; if there is no English language equivalent; or if they are more up to date than similar English language works or translations.

Brother James has included many works written or sponsored by non-Catholics where those works dealt exclusively or in large part with the Church. In general, however, books by non-Catholics on topics such as patrology and scripture, which are of common interest to all Christians, have been excluded in favor of a more thorough listing of works from Catholic sources. While scholars in these fields may justly feel that this results in an unbalanced list, it is a fact that there are several general bibliographies which include those titles deliberately excluded by Brother James.

Catholic authorship alone, however, has not been enough to justify the inclusion of a reference work. The contents or point of view must relate in some way to Catholicism. Hence, a science dictionary written by a Catholic has not been included, nor has any work whose Catholic authorship in no way makes it distinguishable from other books on the same topic. Periodicals have not been included except those of a bibliographic nature or that publish annual bibliographies.

The critical opinions cited by Brother James are largely from Catholic sources, a fact that detracts somewhat from the objectivity of the work; however, non-Catholic and secular media have not as a rule covered the more, obscure Catholic reference works, and opinions from these sources were simply not available for the majority of books included in this bibliography.

The subject arrangement followed by Brother James resulted largely from the nature of the books themselves and follows the general Dewey Decimal outline used in other guides to reference works. The theology classification is based upon the traditional divisions in Catholic theology.

Brother James has made a significant contribution to bibliography. While limited strictly to Catholic materials, his guide provides a valuable addition to ecumenical studies and will be used by researchers for many years to come in their study of the structure, history, and teachings of the Catholic Church.
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
RUSSELL E. BIDLACK

VOLUME 2

PREFACE
In preparing this second edition, I was somewhat surprised to find that there had been more activity in Catholic reference book publication since 1970 than I had originally expected. Over 160 completely new works are included as are 16 new editions of works previously listed. Most of these, in keeping with the limitations of the first edition, are in English, although no important foreign language works have been omitted. Indeed, some of the largest works and most significant new titles were produced in Italy, Vatican City, Poland and other European countries.

This edition contains 202 more titles than the first. Some entries are repeated in different chapters; very few titles have been deleted; and over 40 titles published before 1970 have been added —some of these as a result of reconsideration, but others were simply missed in my original research. Since there is no simple key to identifying Catholic reference works, I will appreciate notification of the omission of any work that appears to fit the definition contained in the "Introduction."

This work was originally written in another form as a Ph.D. dissertation for the School of Library Science of the University of Michigan, and it owes its existence to the members of the Doctoral Committee who originally decided to accept the topic and to the members of the Dissertation Committee: Dr. Russell Bidlack, Chairman, Drs. Kenneth Vance, John Reidy, Edmond Low and Sister Mary Claudia Carlen, all of whom were most kind in offering advice and sound criticism despite very busy schedules. Another member of the Michigan faculty whom I consulted was Dr. Raymond Kilgour who served on the Committee until his retirement in April of 1968.

Sister Mary Claudia, whose name appears frequently in this bibliography, supplied perhaps the most aid and encouragement as a result of her expertise in the field of Catholic bibliography, and much of the research was done at her library at Marygrove College, Detroit, Michigan.

Other libraries where I received welcome and aid were at the University of Michigan, the Catholic University of America, Villanova University, The University of Pennsylvania, Allentown College, and the Library of Congress.

Miss Susan Bonenberger helped prepare the manuscript; Mrs. Phyllis Vogel typed it with great patience and skill; and Mrs. Kathryn Stephanoff corrected the proof sheets.

Finally, I would like to acknowledge the kindness of my brothers in the Congregation of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales who provided accommodations and encouragement during my research.
James P. McCabe, O.S.F.S. Center Valley, PA

INTRODUCTION
In 1971, when the first edition of this work appeared, Wilson Library Bulletin said of it: "The Critical Guide to Catholic Reference Books is distinguished for the quality of its annotations, the informed selection of its titles and the fullness of its bibliographic data, reflecting the scholarly judgment of its author" (XLVI [September 1971], p. 84). Other reviewers have praised the work for its comprehensive scope, logical organization, frequency of cross references in the annotations, and its excellent index. Indeed, the unanimously positive reception of this work and its popularity with libraries of all types has prompted the publisher and author to attempt this second edition which has been enlarged by more than ten percent in the number of titles included and thoroughly revised where necessary in the material carried over from the first edition.

A number of bibliographical studies of Catholic literature have been done in recent years, but these works have been primarily concerned either with guiding the reader to the "best books" on a particular subject or with listing all books by and/or about Catholics and Catholicism published in a given period or place. In the present work, James McCabe has compiled a much more comprehensive guide in the area of Catholic bibliography than has been attempted previously. He has provided a critical introduction to over 1,100 of the most important reference books in English and foreign languages whose contents or point of view relate in some way to Catholicism.

In formulating a definition of a reference work, Brother James has gone beyond the conventional definition and, like Constance M. Winchell in her Guide to Reference Books, has included books "which, while intended primarily to be read through for either information or pleasure, are so comprehensive and accurate in their treatment and so well provided with indexes that they serve also as reference books" (8th edition, Chicago, American Library Association, 1967, p. xiv). The books listed fall into two classes: 1) those dealing with topics peculiar to the Church, such as liturgy and other theological disciplines; and 2) those dealing with the social sciences, literature, the arts, and similar subjects to which Catholics have traditionally contributed a unique perspective.

In selecting titles from this body of literature for inclusion here. Brother James introduced a number of limitations which have added to the practicality of his list. Only published works currently available to the researcher in the United States are included. Rare or very old books have been omitted unless they are unusually important or unique. While the main emphasis is on works in English, foreign language titles have been freely included if they are widely known, comprehensive in scope, and scholarly; if there is no English language equivalent; or if they are more up to date than similar English language works or translations.

Brother James has included many works written or sponsored by non-Catholics where those works dealt exclusively or in large part with the Church. In general, however, books by non-Catholics on topics such as patrology and scripture, which are of common interest to all Christians, have been excluded in favor of a more thorough listing of works from Catholic sources. While scholars in these fields may justly feel that this results in an unbalanced list, it is a fact that there are several general bibliographies which include those titles deliberately excluded by Brother James.

Catholic authorship alone, however, has not been enough to justify the inclusion of a reference work. The contents or point of view must relate in some way to Catholicism. Hence, a science dictionary written by a Catholic has not been included, nor has any work whose Catholic authorship in no way makes it distinguishable from other books on the same topic. Periodicals have not been included except those of a bibliographic nature or that publish annual bibliographies.

The critical opinions cited by Brother James are largely from Catholic sources, a fact that detracts somewhat from the objectivity of the work; however, non-Catholic and secular media have not as a rule covered the more obscure Catholic reference works, and opinions from these sources were simply not available for the majority of books included in this bibliography.

The subject arrangement followed by Brother James resulted largely from the nature of the books themselves and follows the general Dewey Decimal outline used in other guides to reference works. The theology classification is based upon the tradi¬tional divisions in Catholic theology.

Brother James has made a significant contribution to bibliography. While limited strictly to Catholic materials, his guide provides a valuable addition to ecumenical studies and will be used by researchers for many years to come in their study of the structure, history, and teachings of the Catholic Church.
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Russell E. Bidlack

VOLUME 3

PREFACE
Preparing this third edition has been rewarding and informative. Of the 243 new entries included, over 160 of them were published after 1978. The rest are older works discovered in my research or pointed out to me by readers. Some thirty-eight titles listed in the second edition have been revised and are listed in their new editions. New publications of Catholic reference works are most numerous, naturally, in the theological disciplines (Chapter II). The appearance of the new Code of Canon Law in 1983 generated thirteen new entries in Chapter IV. Other new titles are distributed fairly evenly throughout the other subject areas.

This work was originally written in another form as a Ph.D. dissertation for the School of Library Science of the University of Michigan, and it owes its existence to the members of the doctoral committee who originally decided to accept the topic and to the members of the dissertation committee: Dr. Russell Bidlack, Chairman, Drs. Kenneth Vance, John Reidy, and Edmond Low, and Sister Mary Claudia Carlen, all of whom were most kind in offering advice and sound criticism despite very busy schedules. Another member of the Michigan faculty whom I consulted was Dr. Raymond Kilgour who served on the committee until his retirement in April 1968.

Sister Mary Claudia, whose name appears frequently in this bibliography, supplied perhaps the most aid and encouragement as a result of her expertise in the field of Catholic bibliography, and much of the research was done at her library at Marygrove College, Detroit, Michigan.

Other libraries where I received welcome and aid were at the University of Michigan, the Catholic University of America, Villanova University, the University of Pennsylvania, Allentown College, and the Library of Congress.

Mrs. Phyllis Vogel typed the manuscript with great patience and skill; and Mrs. Kathryn Stephanoff corrected the proof sheets.
XI

INTRODUCTION
In 1971, when the first edition of this work appeared, Wilson Library Bulletin said of it: "The Critical Guide to Catholic Reference Books is distinguished for the quality of its annotations, the informed selection of its titles and the fullness of its bibliographic data, reflecting the scholarly judgment of its author" (XLVI [September 1971, p. 84). Similar accolades greeted the second edition in 1980. Reviewers have praised the work for its comprehensive scope, logical organization, frequency of cross references in the annotations, and its excellent index. Indeed, the unanimously positive reception of this work and its popularity with libraries of all types have prompted the publisher and author to attempt this third edition, which has been enlarged by more than twenty percent in the number of titles included and thoroughly revised where necessary in the material carried over from the second edition.

A number of bibliographical studies of Catholic literature have been done in recent years, but these works have been primarily concerned either with guiding the reader to the "best books" on a particular subject or with listing all books by and/or about Catholics and Catholicism published in a given period or place. In the present work, James McCabe has compiled a much more comprehensive guide in the area of Catholic bibliography than has been attempted previously. He has provided a critical introduction to over fifteen hundred of the most important reference books in English and foreign languages whose contents or point of view relate in some way to Catholicism.

In formulating a definition of a reference work, McCabe has gone beyond the conventional definition and, like Constance M. Winchell in her Guide to Reference Books, has included books "which, while intended primarily to be read through for either information or pleasure, are so comprehensive and accurate in their treatment and so well provided with indexes that they serve also as reference books" (8th edition, Chicago, American Library Association, 1967, p. xiv). The books listed fall into two classes: 1) those dealing with topics peculiar to the Church, such as liturgy and other theological disciplines; and 2) those dealing with the social sciences, literature, the arts, and similar subjects to which Catholics have traditionally contributed a unique perspective.

In selecting titles from this body of literature for inclusion here, McCabe introduced a number of limitations which have added to the practicality of his list. Only published works currently available to the researcher in the United States are included. Rare or very old books have been omitted unless they are unusually important or unique. While the main emphasis is on works in English, foreign-language titles have been freely included if they are widely known, comprehensive in scope, and scholarly; if there is no English-language equivalent; or if they are more up to date than similar English-language works or translations.

Also included are many works written or sponsored by non-Catholics where those works dealt exclusively or in large part with the Church. In general, however, books by non-Catholics on topics such as patrology and scripture, which are of common interest to all Christians, have been excluded in favor of a more thorough listing of works from Catholic sources. While scholars in these fields may justly feel that this results in an unbalanced list, it is a fact that there are several general bibliographies that include those titles deliberately excluded by McCabe.

Catholic authorship alone, however, has not been enough to justify the inclusion of a reference work. The contents or point of view must relate in some way to Catholicism. Hence, a science dictionary written by a Catholic has not been included, nor has any work whose Catholic authorship in no way makes it distinguishable from other books on the same topic. Periodicals have not been included except those of a bibliographic nature or that publish annual bibliographies.

The critical opinions cited here are largely from Catholic sources, a fact that detracts somewhat from the objectivity of the work; however, non-Catholic and secular media have not as a rule covered the more obscure Catholic reference works, and opinions from these sources were simply not available for the majority of books included in this bibliography.

The subject arrangement resulted largely from the nature of the books themselves and follows the general Dewey Decimal outline used in other guides to reference works. The theology classification is based upon the traditional divisions in Catholic theology.
McCabe has made a significant contribution to bibliography. While limited strictly to Catholic materials, his guide provides a valuable addition to ecumenical studies and will be used by researchers for many years to come in their study of the structure, history, and teachings of the Catholic Church.

Ann Arbor, Michigan
Russell E. Bidlack

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